Rejuvenate “Tired and Sleepy” Eyes With Blepharoplasty

Firm eyelids and a youthful look, that’s what you want to see in the mirror each morning. Happily, simply by placing yourself in the hands of Dr. Mark Glasgold and his associates, you can soon restore that wide-eyed and vibrant countenance you desire. After all, the eyes are known as the windows to the soul for good reason. Left to droop and loosen, your upper eyelids start to cover your eyes. That hooded, heavy appearance to your gaze, deceptive as it may be, will make you look sleepy and older. Eyelid surgery is the answer, surgery that’ll erase the years that hang above your still very much young at heart eyes.

The youth-rejuvenating results are fully realizable, but the best possible outcome requires the services of a true professional, someone who’ll consider every factor and lead you carefully through the procedure. Are there risks? How long of a recovery period should you expect after the eyelid surgery has concluded? For answers to these questions and more, please read on.

Understand The Procedure

Known by plastic surgeons as an Upper Blepharoplasty, the goal is to skillfully rejuvenate the skin of the upper lids. The procedure uses several small incisions to erase the years, to remove puffiness and that heavy aspect to the eyes that conveys an impression of weariness or apathy. Generally speaking, your plastic surgeon will recommend a local anesthesia. For full comfort and a stress-free experience, talk to Dr. Glasgold about a local, plus IV sedation.

At any rate, with thoughts of discomfort now dismissed, you’re likely wondering where the incisions will be placed. Like any other plastic surgeon, a specialist who views his work with a high degree of professionalism, the doctor directs his actions with great dexterity. Each carefully applied surgical incision is delicately concealed within the lines of an eyelid crease. Excess fat and tissue are removed at this point, and the area is sculpted ever so slightly so that the upper lid area gains a smooth, contoured appearance.

Characterizing Eyelid Surgery Experiences

Sitting in a waiting room, you worry a little. Escorted into the doctor’s office and seated, those worries evaporate like an early morning mist. For every question you have, there’s a reassuring answer. Indeed, you discover that eyelid surgery on the upper lid is considered routine, although the Glasgold group never treats any procedure as routine; as soon as you enter the sanitized operation area, every move, every incision and surgical action, will be made with clinical precision.

First of all, there’s the local anesthetic to administer. A slight stinging sensation is possible here, but that feeling soon passes. A light IV sedative is also carefully dispensed at this moment, all the better to assure a comfortable and anxiety-free procedure, from start to end. Only when the upper lid area is numb and you’re ready does the blepharoplasty commence. The incisions are concealed, perhaps in the fold of your eyelid or in a fine skin crease. Then, when the lid contours are well-defined and the puffiness-causing fat is removed, a few mico-sutures are used to invisibly conceal the work.

In point of fact, after the procedure is over, there should be very little bruising or swelling. The local anesthetic minimizes such post-op issues. Diligently wielding his instruments, your doctor also works hard, and with supreme dexterity, to ensure the incision marks blend into your natural skin creases and light wrinkles.

Who Will Enjoy The Benefit?

If you’re constantly being asked if you’re getting enough sleep, a moment comes when you wonder why everyone’s convinced you’re so sleepy. Perhaps you’re a woman, and your eye makeup would benefit from larger, smoother eyelids. Or, if you’re a man, that promotion you’ve been after is out of reach because your hooded eyes are making you look sleepy and old. Whatever the reason, this eyelid surgery could just be your way out of the eyelid-heavy doldrums.

Of course, you’re not worried about an obstruction to your visual field when you’re on the verge of opting for an upper blepharoplasty, but you’re certainly beginning to experience a different kind of anxiety. Looking in the mirror, seeing the reactions of friends, colleagues, and family, you just want to rejuvenate your eyelids and be able to convey the inner energies you’re experiencing. Thankfully, restored by this procedure, your eyes will look well-rested and significantly younger.

What Are The Post-Op Effects?

Well, a light swelling effect around the lid area is common. That post-op outcome could linger for as long as a week, and it may be accompanied by some localized discomfort, but it will fade. If the discomfort does last longer, please do contact your plastic surgeon. Otherwise, post-operative dressings are not required, and you can resume normal activities when the preoperative narcotics have safely worn off. As for driving, don’t attempt to drive until all narcotics and pain meds have passed through your body. Additionally, consider remaining a passenger until all of that concentration-debilitating eye discomfort has gone.

For more information and an appointment, call the offices of Dr. Mark Glasgold. Board-certified in facial plastic surgery, Dr. Glasgold and his professionally accredited colleagues will work with you to ensure you receive the highest level of care and consideration. Dr. Glasgold specializes in facial rejuvenation techniques including eyelid surgeries in New Jersey. From the moment your consultation begins to the moment your procedure concludes, your path to a positive outcome is our sole concern.

This is a sponsored guest post.

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